Homemade Cleaners to Detox Your Home

Keep toxins out of your home and save money with safe, effective homemade cleaners.

Lemon’s citric acid content cuts stubborn grease and makes your home smell fresh.
Photo by Joe Lavine

By Kim Erickson

Nothing feels as comforting and welcoming as a tidy, well-tended home. But a clean home isn’t necessarily a healthy one. As you peruse the cleaning aisle’s furniture polishes, air fresheners, carpet deodorizers and stain removers, you may realize that a full product arsenal could contain literally hundreds of chemicals and include dozens of safety warnings—not to mention cost a small fortune. Fortunately, you can create nontoxic, inexpensive counterparts to nearly every conventional cleaning product with items found in your pantry.

DIY Lemongrass Dust cloths offer the convenience of disposable furniture wipes without the guilt of contributing to the landfill
Photo by Joe Lavine

Baking Soda: A truly multitasking cleaner, baking soda is a perfect substitute for cleaning powders that scour sinks and tubs without scratching. It’s also great for wiping down and deodorizing the fridge. Combined with an equal amount of vinegar, baking soda can freshen drains and prevent them from clogging.

Borax: Combining equal amounts of white vinegar and borax will banish mold and mildew from hard surfaces. This natural mineral can also clean your toilet. Pour 1 cup of borax into the toilet bowl and let it sit for a few hours before scrubbing to eliminate stains and odor

Distilled White Vinegar: This pantry staple cuts grease, eats away lime deposits and destroys odors. Because of its neutralizing properties, white vinegar is also good for washing windows, sanitizing kitchen counters and shining bathroom fixtures. Simply dilute 1 part vinegar in 4 parts water. A natural antibacterial because of its high acid content, vinegar is an effective alternative to caustic cleaners on toilets and floors.

Lemon’s citric acid content cuts stubborn grease and makes your home smell fresh. A natural abrasive, salt is perfect for cleaning grungy ovens  and soaking up fresh carpet stains.
Photo by Joe Lavine

 

Hydrogen Peroxide: Typically found in the medicine cabinet, this disinfectant can also be used as an effective bleach alternative in the laundry room. Because it’s also a powerful oxidizing agent, it works especially well on food, soil, plant, blood and other organic stains. Just make sure to spot test in a discreet area because, like bleach, hydrogen peroxide may lighten fabrics. For each average-size load of whites, add 8 ounces of 3 percent hydrogen peroxide after you have filled the washer with hot water.

Salt: Perfect for cleaning grungy ovens, this natural abrasive is also great for soaking up fresh carpet stains such as red wine, coffee or ink. Pour salt on the wet stain. Let dry, then vacuum.

Vegetable Oil (Castile) Soap: This natural soap is great for floors and all-purpose cleaning when combined with vinegar, borax or even warm water. For an all-purpose cleaner, add 1⁄2 teaspoon of soap to either 2 cups of water or to the “All-Purpose Cleaner and Disinfectant” recipe below. For floors, combine 2 teaspoons of soap with 3 gallons of water. Make sure to rinse well to remove any dulling residue.

Castile Soap

Washing Soda: This old-fashioned laundry booster cuts through tough grease on grills, broiler pans and ovens. Because washing soda is a strong alkaline, it’s perfect for tackling dirty linoleum floors. But because it’s caustic and strong enough to strip wax and peel paint, wear gloves when using—and use sparingly. Adding just 1⁄4 to 1⁄2 teaspoon of washing soda to 32 ounces of hot water will tackle the toughest grease.

Lemons: Lemon’s citric acid content cuts stubborn grease and makes your home smell fresh. Lemon juice is also a natural bleach, especially when combined with the sun. Freshen cutting boards by rubbing a cut lemon over the surface. This is especially effective for banishing fish odors. Undiluted lemon juice can also be used to dissolve soap scum and hard water deposits.

Homemade Cleaners

All-purpose cleaner and disinfectant

Just as effective as popular antibacterial cleansers, this formula is perfect for kitchen and bathroom surfaces.

2 cups hot water
¼ cup white vinegar
½ teaspoon washing soda (similar to, but more caustic than, baking soda)
15 drops tea tree essential oil
15 drops lavender essential oil

Combine all ingredients in a reusable spray bottle and shake well. To use, spray on surfaces, especially cutting boards, countertops and toilets. Wipe with a dry cloth.

Lemongrass dust cloths

Whether you’re using microfiber cloths or old cloth diapers, these do-it-yourself dusters offer the convenience of disposable furniture wipes without the guilt of contributing to the landfill. Make several dustcloths at a time.

1 cup water
1 cup white vinegar
¼ teaspoon lemongrass essential oil
Dustcloths or rags
Freshly cut lemon peel

Combine water, vinegar and essential oil in large bowl. Soak dustcloths in the solution for 30 minutes. Squeeze out cloths, leaving them slightly damp. Lay cloths flat and place a couple pieces of lemon peel on each one. Fold each cloth in half or thirds and roll up. Place each cloth in a glass jar along with an extra piece of lemon peel. Cap tightly with a screw lid. To use, unfold cloth and discard peel. Dust as usual. Launder dustcloths when dirty and infuse again with essential oil and lemon peel.

Creamy nonabrasive cleaner

Perfect for acrylic and fiberglass surfaces, this smooth cleanser won’t scratch tubs, stovetops or laminate countertops.

¼  cup borax
Vegetable oil-based liquid soap (also known as castile soap)
½  teaspoon lemon essential oil

In a small bowl, combine borax with just enough liquid soap to create a thick paste. Add essential oil and blend well. To use, scoop a small amount of cleaner onto a damp sponge. Scrub surface and rinse well.

Pre-vacuum carpet freshener

This fragrant odor eliminator will leave your home smelling fresh without posing a danger to pets or children.

1 cup dried lavender flowers
2 cups baking soda
10 drops lavender essential oil
10 drops rose geranium essential oil

Crush lavender flowers and mix with baking soda, breaking up any clumps. Add essential oils and blend well. To use, sprinkle on carpets. Wait 30 minutes, then vacuum as usual. Store leftovers in a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid.

[ http://www.motherearthliving.com/Natural-Cleaning/Eight-Natural-Homemade-Cleaners  ]

7 thoughts on “Homemade Cleaners to Detox Your Home

  1. I am always continually impressed with hydrogen peroxides ability to get certain stains out of clothing! I try as hard as possible to use natural cleaners in our house. Vinegar is another agent I love using..and adding essential oils really do help tone down the vinegary smell!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Awesome! Our house is getting closer to 100% chemical free everyday. Do you realize that a person is introduced to over 40 chemicals each day before we ever eat breakfast!?!? Soaps, lotions, toothpaste, etc.. scary.
    My wife and I were introduced to Young Living Essential Oils and products almost 5 years ago… and we haven’t looked back since. Our grandson has homemade lotions, baby wipes.. the Thieves line of cleaning products, laundry soaps, toothpaste.. amazing. One thing I’ve found as we get closer to a chemical free home is that we are rarely sick and feel much better overall. We love to go around and educate people on these products and such things as a Chemical Free Home.. its amazing how much money you can save by getting rid of all those different bottles under your sink etc. I love your post and your recipes! Thanks for sharing! Shannon

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s